Ethernet Cables

mac

    Sponsored Links

    Next

  • 1. one diary, multiple accounts
    Hi All, OS10.3.3 is it possible to share an iCal diary, and/or an address book across multiple accounts on the same laptop? I do not want to publish on the internet, and export/import synching is a spanner in the workflow. Any tricks? If the diary file could live on the Shared user that would get the result required, but tere seems no means of changing the default (wherever that is). regards Chris brown Neurosurgery University of Adelaide
  • 2. New Mac owner looking for keyboard combonations
    Greetings I was looking for some help perhaps a link to a site on the keyboard combonations on Mac OS. I was a Windows user so ctrl-alt-del for example would allow me to force exit a app. On the Mac this is all different and there are even new keys such as the apple key, they option key and so on. I tried to empty the trash with the keyboard combo the finder showed me but that never seems to work. I guess I just need somewhere to go to get a list of all the key combos. tia
  • 3. Thoth?
    What happened to Thoth, I just visited thothsw, nothing there. I am a registered user at v 1.7.1 Thanks, Ken
  • 4. Finder's "Find" quit working in Panther 10.3.3
    Over the past few weeks the Finder's "Find" function has quit working. It doesn't even find file names that are clearly on a given HD volume. Even after manually indexing the volume under the Get Info window, it still comes up empty handed. The only significant changes on my G4 over the past couple of weeks were a few software upgrades for Stuffit Expander 8.0.2, Eudora 6.1, and Fetch 4.0.3. Can anyone suggest what the problem might be and how to fix it? Thanks in advance. --SD

ethernet cables

Postby nosredna » Mon, 22 Dec 2003 01:49:25 GMT

I just bought a TrippLite 75-foot ethernet cable to add my daughter's PC 
to my two-Mac/two-printer network (Linksys router/hub). The cable 
doesn't work on the PC or my G4 but it does work with the antiquated 
Performa 6116 and the LaserWriter. Anyone here know why this is so? (I 
posted the problem on comp.sys.mac.comm but there's hardly anyone there 
these days.)

Re: ethernet cables

Postby Tim McNamara » Mon, 22 Dec 2003 03:13:22 GMT

nosredna < XXXX@XXXXX.COM > writes:


Are they crossover or straight cables?  There's be a little tag near
one end identifying which is which.

Re: ethernet cables

Postby Gnarlodious » Mon, 22 Dec 2003 03:26:04 GMT

Like Tim said, you need to know about autosensing. Macs have had the
autosensing Ethernet circuit for quite a while but PC machines only recently
discovered them. This is why you can use a straight cable between Macs but
suddenly it won't work on a PC, it isn't even detected as existing. Your 75
foot cable is quite an investment, possibly you can get a gizmo such as a
"crossover adapter" to make it work. But every additional connection
decreases speed.


--Gnarlie


Re: ethernet cables

Postby Kevin Stevens » Mon, 22 Dec 2003 03:51:45 GMT

In article < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >,




How do you know it's the *cable* that isn't working with those machines?  
layer 1 problems are quite difficult to troubleshoot without special 
equipment - if your diagnosis is based on "I can't ping" or "I can't 
mount a file share", it's entirely possible that there's other layer 2/3 
things going on.

Try this, just for grins:

Make sure the G4 is working, however you define that, with its original 
cable.

Unplug that cable from the Linksys (you say "hub" but it's probably a 
switch if it's combined with the router).

Unplug the other end of that cable from the G4.

Wait 2 minutes.

Plug that same end of the original cable back into the G4.

Plug the other end of the original cable back into the original port on 
the Linksys.

Wait 1 minute.

Verify the G4 is "still working".

If so, now you have a test procedure against which you can validate the 
Tripplite cable.

Do the same steps, but after the 2 minute disconnect, substitute the 
Tripplite cable when reconnecting to the Linksys.  Be sure to use the 
same port.

NOW if the G4 isn't "still working" you know you have a cable problem, 
rather than a switch problem or an IP/DHCP assignment problem or a MAC 
restriction problem, etc.  Apologies if you already did this testing.

The standard common issue is having a crossover cable instead of a 
straight-through, but that doesn't match your symptoms very well.  
However, if you're plugging the cable into a new/different port on the 
Linksys when you attach to the Performa/printer, that PORT may be 
crossed-over itself (designated as an uplink port).  In which case, if 
you have a crossover CABLE as well, it would work on that port only 
(regardless of which computer is attached).

KeS

Re: ethernet cables

Postby Kevin Stevens » Mon, 22 Dec 2003 03:54:51 GMT

In article < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >,




Oh, another obvious check I should have mentioned, sorry.  Is the 
Tripplite a full duplex cable (can you see eight wires in the RJ45 jack 
on the end, or only 4?

If it's not fully wired, the newer machines might be {*filter*} over trying 
to establish a full-duplex connection (again assuming that Linksys is 
actually a switch), while the older ones could be half-duplex capable 
only and wouldn't care.

KeS

Re: ethernet cables

Postby tacitr » Mon, 22 Dec 2003 03:55:42 GMT

>I just bought a TrippLite 75-foot ethernet cable to add my daughter's PC

It's miswired. Send it back.

Many store-bought cables are wired in a way that makes them work fine with
older, low-speed 10base-T connections, but fail with faster, 100base-T
connections if the cable is longer than about 30 feet or so. 

Make sure you replace the cable with a "cat5" or "cat5e" cable.



-- 
Rude T-shirts for a rude age:  http://www.**--****.com/ 
Art, literature, shareware, polyamory, kink, and more:
 http://www.**--****.com/ 


Re: ethernet cables

Postby tacitr » Mon, 22 Dec 2003 03:58:51 GMT

>Like Tim said, you need to know about autosensing. Macs have had the

"Autosensing" and "crossover" are two unrelated concepts.

"Autosensing" refers to an Ethernet port's ability to switch between 10base-T
and 100base-T connection speeds.

A crossover cable is used in any setting where two computers are being
connected directly, not through a hub or switch.

The original poster specifically said he's using a Linksys switch; he needs a
straight-through, not a crossover, cable.

The devices that work with his cable are 10base-T devices, The devices that
don't work are 100base-T devices. Because the cable is longer than 30 feet,
this makes me suspect the cable itself. many cheap cables work fine with
10base-T connections, but won't work at higher 100base-T connections if the
cable is very long.

-- 
Rude T-shirts for a rude age:  http://www.**--****.com/ 
Art, literature, shareware, polyamory, kink, and more:
 http://www.**--****.com/ 


Re: ethernet cables

Postby Tom Stiller » Mon, 22 Dec 2003 05:03:48 GMT

In article 
< XXXX@XXXXX.COM >,





Huh?  Full duplex operation of 10/100base-T does not require eight wires.


-- 
Tom Stiller

PGP fingerprint =  5108 DDB2 9761 EDE5 E7E3 
                   7BDA 71ED 6496 99C0 C7CF

Re: ethernet cables

Postby nosredna » Mon, 22 Dec 2003 05:53:29 GMT

I'm the original poster with the ethernet cable problem. I took the 
75-foot one back. (The store tested it and said it was fine.) Instead of 
getting another of the same brand, I had the store make a 60-foot, since 
I didn't need a 75. Plugged it in and it didn't work on my G4. Put it in 
a different port and it did work. Plugged my G4's cable into the port 
that "didn't work" and it worked! I started suspecting my Linksys 
equipment was faulty (BTW, I have a router and a separate hub, not a 
switch), but after further troubleshooting (& a call to the ISP*) I got 
the PC to work with the new cable (hurray! now my daughter can compute 
to her heart's content without interrupting me to use the G4!). *In the 
meantime I called my ISP whose tech support is in a different city. They 
said it's quite possible that some line work was being done in my area 
(he said they don't always inform him) and that was my problem, not the 
cables. I will bookmark all the helpful posts when they get posted on 
Google Groups, in case I need them in the future (especially the 
troubleshooting sequence by Kevin Stevens). Thanks, guys!

Re: ethernet cables

Postby Clark Martin » Fri, 02 Jan 2004 12:06:20 GMT

In article < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >,




I think he's referring to autosensing crossover.  Of hand I don't know 
of a proper term for it.  Later model Macs can automatically switch the 
pairs so it doesn't matter whether you use a straight cable or a 
crossover cable.

-- 
Clark Martin
Redwood City, CA, USA               Macintosh / Internet Consulting

"I'm a designated driver on the Information Super Highway"

Re: ethernet cables

Postby Clark Martin » Fri, 02 Jan 2004 12:07:18 GMT

In article <BC09E24A.2F65F% XXXX@XXXXX.COM >,




Except that one of the machines that works is a P6116, definitely not a 
machine that can auto-sense anything.

-- 
Clark Martin
Redwood City, CA, USA               Macintosh / Internet Consulting

"I'm a designated driver on the Information Super Highway"

Re: ethernet cables

Postby Clark Martin » Fri, 02 Jan 2004 12:14:07 GMT

In article 
< XXXX@XXXXX.COM >,





It sounds like the cable is not CAT-5 compliant.  That the 100BaseT 
connection can't work with it because the cable can't handle the speed.  
I have some drop cables that came with 10BaseT NICs that are only two 
pair and not CAT-5 rated.  That is the two pair that are there aren't up 
to snuff.  

Do you have an older 10BaseT hub you could use to connect the computers 
to the router/switch.  If it works in the configuration it would confirm 
that the cable isn't capable of 100BaseT.

10BaseT and 100BaseT use only two pairs period.  One pair is send and 
one receive.  10BaseT usually only ran Half Duplex because it was 
typically hooked to a hub which cannot operate in Full Duplex.  Not all 
10BaseT hardware can operate in Full Duplex as there was no way it could 
when it was first designed.

-- 
Clark Martin
Redwood City, CA, USA               Macintosh / Internet Consulting

"I'm a designated driver on the Information Super Highway"

Ethernet Cables

Postby Gene Williams » Mon, 01 Nov 2004 22:00:59 GMT

What is the meaning of the various colors, i.e., yellow, blue, green, in
the description of Ethernet cables?  And, is a "patch" cable the same as
a "crossover?"

Regards,
Gene


Re: Ethernet Cables

Postby abuse » Mon, 01 Nov 2004 23:36:31 GMT

Gene Williams < XXXX@XXXXX.COM > writes:


Anything you want it to be.  The colors are useful to identify things.


No, regular ethernet cable uses solid wires and is not very flexible.
Patch cords use stranded wires so they bend a lot easier.

Ethernet uses one pair of wires to transmit and another pair to receive
data.  Each end must agree on which pair goes which way.  This is usually
done by having having all the computers set up one way, and the hub which
connectts them all set up the other way.

A crossover cable is used to connect two computers directly together.
Normal cables connect computers to hubs, a crossover cable eliminates
the need for a hub.

Apple on the other hand has been using hardware ports that automatically
switch to which ever of the two modes is necessary to talk to the other
end for some years now, which makes a crossover cable obselete....

Billy Y..

Re: Ethernet Cables

Postby Gene Williams » Tue, 02 Nov 2004 00:52:44 GMT

Thanks!






Similar Threads:

1.Ethernet Cable for a Macintosh Performa 6100 Series

I was wondering if someone can direct me to where I can purchase an Ethernet 
Cable for a Macintosh Performa 6100 Series.


2.Ethernet Cables

What is the meaning of the various colors - red, yellow, etc. - in the
description of Ethernet cables?

And, is a "patch" cable the same thing as a "crossover?"

Thanks,
Gene

3.Ethernet cable best?

Is there a "best" or "better" type of ethernet cable to use in wiring a 
house?

Like to make sure we use what is the current best option both in terms 
of manufacturer and type.

Thanks for any tips.

-- 
Please send email to: nwhiii at yahoo dot com

4.Ethernet Cables

What is the meaning of the various colors, i.e., yellow, blue, green, in
the description of Ethernet cables?  And, is a "patch" cable the same as
a "crossover?"

Regards,
Gene

5.Replacing back up battery in G4 PB which wont recognise ethernet cable

I have an apparently working 1 GHz Powerbook G4. I took the Airport Express 
card out of it to lend to my offspring. Now the G4 wont recognise that any 
ethernet cable is connected to it at all. Port isn't damaged, the cable just 
isn't recognised.

Tried power reset, C-O-P-R, moving eth to first place in Leopard Network 
list, and am out of ideas.  The date and time do however revert to 1967 
whenever I leave the computer for a few days so I thought this might be a 
backup battery. Apple says it is a button one on the circuit board but 
somehow it defies googing on the 12. inch model?? (or I am using the wrong 
term for what is called the PRAM battery on the 15 inch).  Does anyone know 
what battery this is and how to replace it on a 12.2 inch G4? (and whether 
it can have any effect on whether the Ethernet cable is seen or not?) 


6. Transferring files from windows xp to mac os x with an ethernet cable

7. Ethernet cables. Are there crossover versions?`

8. "Ethernet cable not plugged in"



Return to mac

 

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 78 guest